Second Smoked Pork Shoulder

This past winter I smoked a pork shoulder for the first time. I learned some lessons, continued to work on getting better with my kettle, and decided it was time for pulled pork again.

Unfortunately, the price of pork was up $1.49/lb from $0.99/lb this winter.

I cut the pork shoulder into roughly equal halves. I had three things I wanted to experiment with:

  1. Would it cook faster?
  2. Would it be nice to have twice as much bark?
  3. I wanted to try a Mexican-ish rub on one to have pulled pork tacos.
The larger pork shoulder half
The larger pork shoulder half
The smaller half of the pork shoulder
The smaller half of the pork shoulder

In my opinion, for a long Weber Kettle cook you can’t beat a snake. If it’s going to go VERY long, it can be a pain as you have to move the water pan to continue the snake. But for medium-long cooks, it’s a nice, perfect way to have a consistent temperature throughout the cook.

Snake or fuse method
Snake or fuse method

This time around I went with Apple wood chunks to see if I could taste the difference from Hickory. Well, without them side-by-side I couldn’t really tell the difference.

Charcoal setup with the apple wood chunks
Charcoal setup with the apple wood chunks

Used the Weber Spirit as a safe place to light the first ten coals.

Lighting the charcoal
Lighting the charcoal

We were expecting rain, so I also setup my umbrella.

With the fire going, I set about to putting the rub on the pork shoulders while waiting for the kettle to get to 225 F.

Pork shoulder rubs
Pork shoulder rubs

It was quite windy and I ended up keeping the lower vents mostly open for most of the smoke.

And here’s a shot partway through the cook.

Two shoulders was just a bit too much side-by-side on the Kettle if you’re leaving enough space between them and keeping them away from getting direct heat from the snake/fuse. Here’s the graph of the smoke:

Pork Shoulder 20170506
Pork Shoulder 20170506

The fajita rub was off the fire first:

Fajita Rub Pork Shoulder
Fajita Rub Pork Shoulder

About an hour later, the Meathead rub shoulder was done:

One pulled pork and one freshly plucked from the kettle
One pulled pork and one freshly plucked from the kettle
Both pulled pork shoulders
Both pulled pork shoulders

First I created a pulled pork fajita:

pulled pork fajita

It was quite delicious! Then it was time for a pulled pork sandwich:

Pulled Pork with Shealy's BBQ Sauce
Pulled Pork with Shealy’s BBQ Sauce

I was reading through Meathead’s sauce page on AmazingRibs.com and saw that Shealy’s was the best South Carolina Mustard BBQ sauce. I ordered some from Shealy’s and …. I did not like it. It just tasted like mustard to me. However, as time passed and I tried the sauce with other pork dishes, I came to taste the subtle difference between this sauce (which is mustard, ketchup, and Worcestershire sauce) and regular yellow mustard and I like it quite a bit now.

Finally, my wife had some pulled pork nachos:

Pulled pork nachos
Pulled pork nachos

This time the bark was perfect and my wife loved it. Not sure what’s different. The main difference is that it’s spring now and not winter and Meathead does say that humidity can affect cooks. It’s also possible I overcooked it last time. I’m not 100% sure. Either way, it was a resounding success and I had fun trying all sorts of different dishes with the pulled pork. Also pretty awesome (but I didn’t get a photo) was my pulled pork breakfast burrito.

Author: Eric Mesa

To find out a little more about me, see About Me